History of Knowledge

Seminar Series @ Utrecht University : :










Since the start of the 21st-century, the history of knowledge is emerging as a promising new scholarly field. Though young and still far from coherent, its ambition to broaden the geography and chronology of science is pushing the theoretical boundaries and practices of historical research. Judging by the number and diversity of initiatives - ranging from journals to conferences and edited volumes - it promises to be one of the most dynamic and relevant fields of historical scholarship in the 2020s and beyond. 

Crucial to its development is the creation of new research centres and meeting places, whether virtual or physical. Following up on recent initiatives at Zurich, Chicago and Lund, this bi-monthly seminar series aims to explore the past, present and possible future of the history of knowledge in its broadest sense - covering everything from its relation to the older history of science to its use of digital tools and its relevance to our current knowledge society.

Bringing together leading scholars of both older and younger generations with different backgrounds and approaches, its informal lecture-discussion meetings should be of interest to all who want to keep their finger on the pulse of contemporary thinking in histories of the sciences. More than just an overview of state-of-the-art research, the History of Knowledge Seminar series offers an opportunity to join the process of historiography in the making.




















                           
                   

              

               This seminar series is curated by
               Lukas M. Verburgt, currently
               postdoctoral researcher at
               Utrecht University with a VENI-
               grant from the Dutch Organisation
               for Scientific Research (NWO). He
               he has published widely on the
               history and philosophy of exact
               knowledge in the 19th and 20th
               century, focusing on issues
               ranging from discipline formation
               to abstraction and ignorance. 
               u